The weather may be bad elsewhere in the county, but is fine where I live. Why aren't the nearby Court Facilities in our zone open?
Weather, unlike a power outage or water main break, is not confined to a single area and can spread to different parts of the county. Therefore, the most severe weather conditions within the county are used as the basis for the decision-making criteria. A uniform procedure to close all court facilities is maintained so that the Court system can respond quickly to emergency weather conditions and protect the safety and well being of the public and staff.

The decision to close the courts because of weather is always for the entire system. The Court Calls, prospective Jurors and Probation Officer appointments serve thousands of citizens every day, and 300 staff are required to make these procedures run smoothly. To close a district or zone would mean that any interested parties, for example, litigants, attorneys and witnesses who live in a more affected area might be unable to attend their court case and other court ordered appointments. This may create unequal access to the justice system. Courts must be accessible for all parties to be given the ability to participate in the court proceedings.

Show All Answers

1. How do I find out that the courts are closed or closing due to weather conditions?
2. How about Delayed opening?
3. Where can I access information?
4. How is the decision made to close court facilities during bad weather?
5. The weather may be bad elsewhere in the county, but is fine where I live. Why aren't the nearby Court Facilities in our zone open?
6. What about after hour and/or weekend activities?
7. How do I reschedule Court Cases or Probation Officer Appointments missed due to "Announced Weather Closures"